1982 – Alberta

Alberta’s economy is collapsing under the weight of Trudeau’s National Energy Program (NEP), which is taking a large portion of Alberta’s oil and gas profits. Alberta separatism, and the Western Canada Concept party is looking for a breakthrough. Can Peter Lougheed steer the PCs through Alberta’s volatile political mood and to another huge majority?

2008 – Alberta v.2

This is the first of the old PM4E Alberta scenarios that I am hoping to remake for the new infinity engine.

Premier Ed Stelmach is seeking his first mandate from the people of Alberta. Alberta’s white-hot economy is beginning to slow and the Opposition has battered the government on the oil royalty issue, health care premiums, and affordable housing. Will Premier Stelmach be able to win another solid majority, or will the PC string of victories end at 37 years?

v.2 – Added candidate riding positions and high score bonuses

2012 – Alberta v.3

As Premier Alison Redford dropped the election writ, she sets off a 28-day provincial campaign that will send Albertans to the polls on April 23 2012. Redford requested Lt.-Gov. Donald Ethell end the Legislature, setting off what is expected to be one of the most competitive election battles in decades. The 28-day campaign will see the PC leader try to extend her party’s 41-year grip on power, while Danielle Smith of the Wildrose Alliance, Raj Sherman of the Alberta Liberals, Brian Mason of the NDP, and Glenn Taylor of the Alberta Party will all be trying to end the Tory dynasty that started in 1971.

Features;

  • Election Data based on official election results with voter shifts to reflect pre-campaign polling
  • 9 Parties and the Electoral Commission as an observer party.
  • Lots of events from the Calgary Herald
  • Updated Issues and regional centres (Definitions are quite generic to reflect a multitude of parties.)
  • Campaign funding totals from Elections Alberta
  • v.3 – Added candidate riding positions and high score bonuses

New Brunswick 2020 : A snap election

Presentation of the mod.

Premier Higgs called a snap election after negotiations failed with the other parties that would have avoided an election until the fixed date in 2022 or the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. Will the election bring a majority to the Premier? Or will it lead to the election of another party? And what about the election as a whole in a full COVID pandemic?

Canada 1997

Feel free to give feedback 🙂

Cuts to programs, a near miss in the Québec referendum, and a rapidly falling defecit have been the hallmarks of Jean Chrétien’s first mandate, and not all voters are happy about it. While Reform attempts to “break out” of the West into Ontario, the PCs and NDP try and rebuild from their disastrous 1993 finishes and the Bloc attempts to keep on despite the loss of Bouchard. Will Chrétien hold on? Prime Minister Jean Chrétien seeks his second term. The PC party, led by the popular Jean Charest, is hoping to rebound from its disastrous 1993 campaign. Can the Reform Party displace the Bloc and become the Official Opposition? Will the NDP be able to build a strong base in the Maritimes, and regain lost ground?

Québec 1994 OUI AU CHANGEMENT !


After 9 years in power, the Liberals of Quebec are aweakened. Despite holding 88 seats, the Canadian constitutionnal crisis and the reject of Brian Mulroney’s Meech Lake accord boosted sovereignism in Quebec to an unprecendent approval support.

The Pequists, led by the very independentist Jacques Parizeau are expecting and willing to make big gains. A year ago, in 1993, the Bloc Québécois with Lucien Bouchard got 50,3% of the vote in Quebec and almost 2 millions votes, winning 54 federal seats and forming the official opposition in Ottawa.

The victory of the PQ has to be the second step of independentist walk, the third will be a referendum in 1995 on sovereignty organized by the government of Quebec. Can the pequists get the second step of the sovereignist walk to independence?

This election is crucial because the sovereignists can’t hold any referendum on sovereignty without winning Quebec’s parliament. The Liberals, without their historical leader, Robert Bourassa, are now led by the last Johnson, Daniel Johnson Jr.
His short term of a year as incumbent Premier didn’t give him the time to deliver a complete strategy against sovereignists but Liberals are up since spring.

The former Liberal youth president Mario Dumont has left his party and is now leading the Action Democratique du Quebec.
Can this young and fresh politician wins his seat of Rivière-du-Loup?
This francophone right-wing party is, for itself, unclear about independence.

The famour polemist and radio animator, André Arthur is also declared as independent candidate and wants to win his seat of Louis-Hebert, local polls give him a solid 27% behind the Parti Québécois.

Will the Pequist prevail? Or the Liberals? Or will the ADQ be able to win enough seats to become the King Maker in this crucial election for Quebec’s future? And what about André Arthur’s bet?