United Kingdom – 2019 (Second Version)

Having failed to win the support of parliament for the PM’s Brexit deal, the Conservative minority government is now on the verge of collapse. But can a general election break the deadlock?

Starting on the 11th of December with Theresa May’s defeat in the Commons, this is an updated version of the 2019 General Election. The polling hasn’t been updated (still Sept. 2018) but some of the parliamentary candidates have been updated from ConservativeHome, LabourList and a Lib Dem blog, (thanks Joe).

New Conservative leaders – Gove and Morgan (as well as May). New Labour leader – Umunna (as well as Corbyn and Thornberry). There’s also a few other updates based on feedback, and a slightly more realistic narrative (though still not a likely one!). Hope you enjoy.

United Kingdom – 2019 II

Herschel

United Kingdom – 2019 (First Version)

The Conservative minority government has announced that no deal has been reached with the EU just over two months before the Article 50 deadline. Without a majority for any kind of Brexit deal in parliament, it is time for the British public to return to the polls and break the Brexit deadlock once and for all.

United Kingdom – 2019

The balance of seats is actually taken from polling in September 2018 but is not implausible.

New leaders since 2017 – Sian Berry, Adam Price and Mary Lou MacDonald. Some possible leaders – James Cleverly, Emily Thornberry and Layla Moran…

The tendency towards two party politics also means that three campaigners are available to the Conservative and Labour leaders, representing their most senior allies. Facebook and Twitter have been added to the endorsers, as social media advertising is influential.

1997 – Welsh Devolution Referendum

1997 – Welsh Devolution Referendum

Click Here to Download the Scenario: Wales – 1997 Referendum

Wales overwhelmingly rejected a devolved assembly in 1979 by a margin of 80%-20%. After Tony Blair won the general election of May 1997, part of his vision for a ‘New Britain’ includes devolved institutions in Scotland and Wales. Scotland is very likely to accept both a Parliament and tax raising powers for a devolved parliament but Wales tends to be more sceptical of devolution. Labour and the Liberal Democrats are pushing hard for a yes vote and Plaid Cymru has reluctantly accepted Labour’s proposals even though they don’t think the plans go far enough. Meanwhile the no campaign is mainly made up of Conservatives but was formed by dissident Labour members, Carys Pugh and Betty Bowen, in the working class Labour stronghold of the Rhondda. They are less well organised than the establishment backed yes campaign but are nevertheless confident of victory. Can the yes campaign win in Wales or will the no side deal the first blow to Tony Blair and his New Labour government?

Yes For Wales Campaign

  • Rt. Hon. Ron Davies MP (Labour)
  • Rt. Hon. Dafydd Wigley MP (Plaid Cymru)
  • Rt. Hon. Peter Hain MP (Labour)
  • Mr. Leighton Andrews (Labour)

Just Say NO Campaign

  • Professor Nick Bourne (Conservative)
  • Mrs Carys Pugh (Labour)
  • Dr Tim Williams (Labour)
  • Mr. Robert Hodge

Replies and Feedback Welcome

Click Here to Download the Scenario: Wales – 1997 Referendum

UK 1997 (SANC Mod)

  • More events
  • Tory committed and leaning changed as they dropped support easily whereas in the real campaign they gained votes during the campaign
  • Major’s experience boosted to 5 and corruption reduced to 1 (the various scandals of the campaign are among the events added)
  • Candidate strengths of scandal hit candidates (Neil Hamilton etc. reduced to 1).

UK 1997 SANC Mod

UK 1964

For Prime Minister Infinity British 2017

The recession during the second half of 1961, Conservative Prime Minister Harold Macmillan’s sacking of seven cabinet members (The Night of the Long Knives, 13th July 1962), and the Profumo affair breaking in 1963 (the Secretary of State for War and MP for Stratford-on-Avon John Profumo having an affair with Christine Keeler who was also having an affair with a Soviet diplomat) have affected the governments’ popularity although this has recovered recently due to Reginald Maudling’s Dash For Growth budget. With the resignation of Macmillan due to a mistaken cancer diagnosis and Hugh Gaitskell’s death both Labour and the Conservatives have new leaders, but the Liberals are still led by Jo Grimond, in the first British general election of the 1960’s.

UK 1964

Daons has a version with the default map and one with the default background of the map I made.

United Kingdom 2017 General Election

  Information

For the past week or so, I’ve been working on a scenario for Prime Minister Infinity
which is based on upcoming UK 2017 General Election.

The scenario is based on the map used in the 2015 scenario provided with the game. All of the polling data was provided by the Electoral Calculus.

Every party leader has been added or changed
– Conservatives have Theresa May
– Labour have Jeremy Corbyn
– Lib Dems have Tim Farron
– UKIP have Paul Nuttall
Just to name a few

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Installation

1. Download the file here 2017
2. Find your main Prime Minister Infinity folder
– Right click on your Prime Minister Infinity desktop icon and click “open file location”
3. Go to the “scenarios” folder
4. Click and drag the “United Kingdom – 2017” folder into the “scenarios” folder
5. Open Prime Minister Infinity, new game, change campaign and select “United Kingdom – 2017”
6. Pick and party and win

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Contains

Partys and leaders:
Conservatives – Theresa May
Labour Party – Jeremy Corbyn
Liberal Democrat – Tim Farron
UK Independence Party – Paul Nuttall
Green Party – Caroline Lucas
Scottish National Party – Nicola Sturgeon
Plaid Cymru – Leanne Wood
Democratic Unionist Party – Arlene Foster
Sinn Féin – Gerry Adams
SDLP – Colum Eastwood
Ulster Unionist – Robin Swann
Alliance – Naomi Long
Other – Leader of a Minor Party
Spectator – Spectator

Events
Ransomware Cyberattack – Boosts National Security – 4 days
Manchester Terror Attack – Boosts National Security – 9 days

Debates
ITV Debate – 18th May – Invited: SNP, Lib Dem, Plaid Cymru, Green and UKIP
Sky News with Paxman – 29th May – Invited: Conservatives and Labour
BBC Debate – 31st May – Invited: All major parties
BBC Debate – 2nd June – Invited: Conservatives and Labour
BBC Debate – 4th June – Invited: SNP and Lib Dem
BBC Debate – 6th June – Invited: All parties

United Kingdom – 2012

President Forever 2008 + Primaries

Author: HarryBarclay

Following the Lib Dems’ crushing defeat in the alternative vote referendum and a drubbing in the local elections, Cameron is forced to push through major constitutional reform to keep Clegg on side.  There follows a sweeping Reform Bill, replacing 900 years of monarchy with a United Republic.  With an elected House of Lords appointing a new President, much like the US electoral college, who will be moving from Whitehall to Buckingham Palace?

United Kingdom – 2012

Please note: a big thank you goes to Tom Hughes who put together the original UK 2010 scenario, which was my inspiration, and from which I have adapted my map.  His excellent scenario is here.

European Union – 2010

President Forever 2008 + Primaries

Author: HarryBarclay

On 19 November 2009, Herman van Rompuy was designated the first permanent President of Europe under the terms of the Lisbon Treaty.  But how would things have fared if the decision had been left to the people, and not to heads of state?  Would a little-known Belgian have taken the top spot, or would Tony Blair and Jean-Claude Juncker, the original favourites, have battled it out?

European Union – 2010