Chile-1970

In 1970 the Chilean situation is not good. With an economy in the midst of recession, the Chilean people look for someone who can lead to a brighter tomorrow. Of course, foreign and business interests have other things in mind. In this three horse election, the fight is between Marxist Salvador Allende, Rightist Jorge Alessandri, and Christian Democrat Radomiro Tomic.

http://campaigns.270soft.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Chile-1970.zip

South Korea – 2017

Fueled by a playable and thankfully shared South Korea 2017 scenario from @daons I am back with an adjusted scenario of one of my most favourite countries. It needs more improvements though. Perhaps someone wants to do this (I can assist if you have questions, I am not fluent in Korean but I find myself going through Wikipedia without major difficulties at least), maybe I find time to improve the scenario as well, we will see.

South Korea has democratic elections since 1987 and I would love to develop all elections, at least to be playable with the candidates who ran. If we make them good enough perhaps, Anthony wants to include them as official campaigns. (and I still hope to have a consecutive elections feature one day) I do not know how the state currently is.

Done:

Working South Korea Map

All 5 major parties and their candidates

Accurate percentages

Needs to be done:

Endorses

Issues

Primary and what-if candidates (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korean_presidential_election,_2017)

 

Feedback is desired ūüôā

South Korea – 2017

2008 – London Mayor – beta version

I have decided to make a port of the 2008 – London Mayoral Election from P4E into PI. The original issues and candidates from Zion’s original scenario have been kept while I made my own map and adjusted polling/turnout to reflect the official result.

Primaries work best when each party has a number of candidates active.

Please remove if this is a copyright strike against an old scenario.

2008 – London Mayor (old version)

17/04/18 – Update

2008 – London Mayor (17/04/18 update)

  • Campaign funding updated (General election candidates start with ¬£420k, Primaries ¬£0 – but there is enough time to fundraise)
  • Fundraising coefficient is set at 5 (less money raised but still a significant amount)
  • Newspaper endorsers open at the start of March (longer time to win the endorser)
  • Primaries – Party nominees are more like to win the primary and have more committed supporters.
  • Two round features/or workarounds haven’t been implemented yet. I am waiting for two-round to be officially added. At the moment for those wanting a Ken v. Boris only match up, I recommend starting in the general and disabling all other candidates bar Labour and Conservative.

Enjoy

Colombia: First Round of the 2018 Presidential Election

Colombia First Round

Introducing the First Round of the 2018 Colombian Presidential Election

REBUILD COLOMBIA ALLIANCE: Democratic Center and disidents from the Conservative Party. (RIGHT WING)

Candidates for the primaries:

  • Marta Lucia Ramirez (Conservative Party Disident)
  • Ivan Duque (Democratic Center)
  • Alejandro Ordonez (United for the Family).
  • Instead of Duque, from the Democratic Center is also:
  • Oscar Ivan Zuluaga the 2014 Democratic Center nominee
  • Carlos Holmes Trujillo the 2014 Democratic Center Vicepresidential nominee
  • Senator Maria del Rosario Guerra.

COALITION COLOMBIA: Green Alliance, Compromise Citizens for Colombia and Democratic Alternative Pole. (CENTER)

Candidates for the primaries:

  • Senator Claudia Lopez from Green Alliance
  • Former Governor of Antioquia Sergio Fajardo of Compromise Citizens for Colombia
  • Senator Jorge Enrique Robledo form the Democratic Alternative Pole
    BETTER VARGAS LLERAS: Radical Change Party and Better Vargas Lleras (RIGHT WING)

Movement.Candidates for the General Election:

  • Former Vicepresident German Vargas Lleras

HUMAN COLOMBIA: Movement Human Colombia (LEFT WING)
Candidate for the General Election:

  • Gustavo Petro, former mayor of Bogota

¬†COALITION FOR PEACE: Liberal Party, Social Party of National Unity, and¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†“We are all Colombia” movement.

Candidate for the primaries:

  • Humberto de la Calle Lombana, former Vicepresident of Colombia.
  • Clara Lopez, former Labour Minister and 2014 Democratic Alternative Pole nominee for president.

FARC: Common Alternative Revolutionary Force

  • Rodrigo Londono

My Confederate Series – 1879

My Confederate Series – 1879

In 1873, Secretary of State John C. Breckinridge was elected to be the 4th President of the Confederate States of America and Secretary of War Richard Taylor of Louisiana was elected to be the 2nd Vice President. However, the past 6 years have been very turbulent, with not one, but two more Presidents dying in office. The chaos started on May 17, 1875, when President Breckinridge died from complications of surgery, elevating Vice President Taylor to the Presidency. But on April 12, 1879, 7 months before the election of 1879, President Taylor also died, resulting in the President pro tempore of the Senate (next in the line of succession), Sen. John B. Gordon, becoming the 6th President of the Confederate States. Also, Missouri (1875), Tennessee (1878), and Kentucky (1879) have all abolished slavery with other states expected to follow, mostly as a result of a major depression sapping the country’s economy. The opposition parties, the New Republican party, the Confederate American party, and the Liberty party, are expected to garner more support combined than the Democratic party, resulting in what is expected to be the closest election in the country’s young history. Can President Gordon beat out General Beauregard for the Democratic nomination and win the Presidency in his own right, or will the CSA have its first non-Democratic President? Candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard
  • Pres. John B. Gordon (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election)
  • Fmr. Sen. John W. Stevenson
  • Sen. Matt Ransom
  • Associate Justice David M. Key
  • Fmr. Gov. James M. Smith

What-if?s

  • Pres. Richard Taylor (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election, had he not died)
  • Rep. Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr.

New Republicans

  • Fmr. Sen. James Alcorn
  • Fmr. Rep. Alexander S. Wallace
  • Fmr. Rep. George Harris
  • Att. Gen. William H. Hunt
  • Fmr. Rep. George Washington Logan

Confederate American

  • Fmr. Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. Zebulon Baird Vance

Liberty Party

  • Rep. Joseph Rainey

Czech Presidential – 2013

The first direct presidential election in the Czech Republic was held on 11‚Äď12 January 2013. No candidate received a majority of the votes in the first round, so a second round runoff election was held on 25‚Äď26 January. Nine individuals secured enough popular signatures or support of parliamentarians to become official candidates for the office. MiloŇ° Zeman (SPOZ) and Karel Schwarzenberg (TOP 09) qualified for the second round of the election.

Special Thanks to republicanny to help with map

Czech Presidential 2013

Colombia 2018 Run Off

Colombia Presidential Run Off

2018 Colombian Run Off Presidential Election:

Change vs Establishment; War Against Corruption Vs War Against Terrorism; Maintain the Peace Deal Vs Destroy The Peace Deal.

UPDATED DECEMBER 1 , 2017

 

After a hard-fought campaign in the first round, Sergio Fajardo won the We Can Alliance primaries, Ivan Duque won the Democratic Center-Conservative Party primaries, German Vargas Lleras from Radical Change Party was nominated, Gustavo Petro from Human Colombia was nominated, and Humberto de la Calle from Liberal Party/Party of the U won the primaries.

After the first round vote on May 27, Fajardo and Duque narrowly advanced into the run-off in¬†June 17. Vargas Lleras endorsed Duque, De la Calle endorsed Fajardo and Petro called for abstention. Nobel Peace Prize winner, current and highly disapproved president Santos, who doesn’t want Democratic Center anti-peace stance in the presidency, is working to elect Fajardo (who favors the peace deal) as the¬†next president, even thought they are not remotely close.

Although Fajardo brings stability¬†to the economic class, the¬†Democratic Center is trying to tie him to the evolving Venezuela crisis and collapse, for having made an alliance with the leftist Alternative Democratic Pole. Venezuelan collapse and neighboring Maduro’s regime atrocities are every day on the news. Both candidates disapprove the current government of Venezuela and call for immediate elections in that country, although Duque goes further and more aggressively.

Support varies among regions but the presidency will be decided in a dead-heat.

Antioquia, Caldas, Risaralda and Quindio the “Paisa Region”, is highly polarized in the run off because Fajardo and Uribe(and thus Duque) are equally and highly popular. Fajardo and Uribe were governors of Antioquia, and mayors of Medellin, the second most important city in the country. Antioquia’s natives colonized decades ago the departments of Caldas, Risaralda and Quindio, and they still share a common history, architecture, culture, accent and idiosyncrasy.

The North Coast/Caribbean coast/”Coste√Īo” culture region: La Guajira, Cesar, Magdalena, Atlantico, Bolivar, Sucre, San Andres Isles and Cordoba. This region has the same accent and common traits with the coastal population from the different countries in the Caribbean like Puerto Rico, or Venezuelans. The “Coste√Īos” consider themselves different than the rest of Colombians, some are pushing integration between them in order to get support for independence from the rest of the country. This region was Vargas Lleras territory in the first round, having won with more than 10% to¬†20% on the first round on May 27 in every department of the North Caribbean Coast, while Fajardo and Duque disputed the second place. ¬†After Vargas Lleras narrowly not making it to the run-off, he supported Duque and as expected, Duque now leads in the North Caribbean Coast heading into¬†the run off by more than double digits.

Central/Interior departments: Norte de Santander, Santander, Boyaca, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Huila. With the exception of Huila, who disapproves highly the peace process and supports Democratic Center as a party, there’s a dead heat in most of the rest of the departments¬†because of the degree of high polarization between both campaigns, that represent very different priorities.

The Pacific Coast: Choco, Valle del Cauca, Cauca and Nari√Īo:

Nari√Īo and Cauca are heavily for the peace process and against the policies of Uribe’s party. ¬†Valle del Cauca (with Cali the third largest city in the country) is leaning for the “We Can Alliance” candidate because it likes the corruption argument against the political class and supports slightly the peace process. Choco: Vargas Lleras territory in the first round, is in a dead heat because the high poverty is playing a double effect, on one side the political machinery is buying poor people’s votes, but the corruption-crisis in that department is such, that rest are clearly tired of the same old politics. This department favors heavily the peace process.

Llanos region: Arauca, Casanare, Meta, Caqueta, Putumayo, Guaviare, Vichada, Guania, Vaupes and Amazonas. The least populated region in the country has a high approval rating for Uribe’s presidency especially in Casanare, Caqueta and Guaviare, were the FARC terrorist group has caused great amount of damage with decades of war. The exception is Putumayo, which has a very negative opinion of Uribe’s party and policies and is heavily for the peace process.

Bogota DC: The capital of Colombia deserves a special place in the list. Bogota has always voted against the political class, for the “outsider”, the change “agent” and will¬†likely support the candidate that rallies the young, which undoubtedly is the “We Can Alliance” candidate. Bogota heavily favors the peace process deal with FARC, making it hard for the Democratic Center to make inroads there, unless war becomes the priority again. A terrorist attack heading to election day might decide this evenly divided, close and heated election.

UPDATED DECEMBER 1 , 2017

Colombia Presidential 2018 Run Off