2020 Presidential Election

2020 Presidential Election [VCCzar version]

[This election was updated by the Historical Scenario Commission on Nov 29, 2017, and it can be downloaded here. United States – 2020vNov-2017

Backstory

It is July 2019, and President Trump’s approval rating has never been above 40% in the average poll.

Donald Trump’s presidency has proven to be as controversial as his 2016 campaign. While his Midwestern base is exceptionally happy, he has alienated many Republicans, mostly with his unique presidential style, but also with his connection to scandalous figures from the Russian probe and some of his policies. Republicans are mostly against impeaching Trump.

Meanwhile, Democrats struggle between reformist establishment figures and populist progressives leading the party, but they have managed to narrowly retake the Senate and the House. As such, impeachment seems likely as more evidence comes in from the Russia probe.

Both parties continue to struggle with making their voters happy, while maintaining the stability and order that the establishment of both parties think is required for American supremacy.

 

bidengeneral

My Confederate Series – 1879

My Confederate Series – 1879

In 1873, Secretary of State John C. Breckinridge was elected to be the 4th President of the Confederate States of America and Secretary of War Richard Taylor of Louisiana was elected to be the 2nd Vice President. However, the past 6 years have been very turbulent, with not one, but two more Presidents dying in office. The chaos started on May 17, 1875, when President Breckinridge died from complications of surgery, elevating Vice President Taylor to the Presidency. But on April 12, 1879, 7 months before the election of 1879, President Taylor also died, resulting in the President pro tempore of the Senate (next in the line of succession), Sen. John B. Gordon, becoming the 6th President of the Confederate States. Also, Missouri (1875), Tennessee (1878), and Kentucky (1879) have all abolished slavery with other states expected to follow, mostly as a result of a major depression sapping the country’s economy. The opposition parties, the New Republican party, the Confederate American party, and the Liberty party, are expected to garner more support combined than the Democratic party, resulting in what is expected to be the closest election in the country’s young history. Can President Gordon beat out General Beauregard for the Democratic nomination and win the Presidency in his own right, or will the CSA have its first non-Democratic President? Candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard
  • Pres. John B. Gordon (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election)
  • Fmr. Sen. John W. Stevenson
  • Sen. Matt Ransom
  • Associate Justice David M. Key
  • Fmr. Gov. James M. Smith

What-if?s

  • Pres. Richard Taylor (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election, had he not died)
  • Rep. Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr.

New Republicans

  • Fmr. Sen. James Alcorn
  • Fmr. Rep. Alexander S. Wallace
  • Fmr. Rep. George Harris
  • Att. Gen. William H. Hunt
  • Fmr. Rep. George Washington Logan

Confederate American

  • Fmr. Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. Zebulon Baird Vance

Liberty Party

  • Rep. Joseph Rainey

1980 US Election

1980 US Election

This scenario is an updated/improved version of the 1980 scenario that comes with the President Infinity game. It was created by the Historical Scenario Commission on November 5, 2017. It can be downloaded here: United States – 1980 – VCCzar with endorsers

This scenario boasts more events, and includes the US Senators for every state. Additionally, the candidates have been adjusted for closer realism. A simulation party has been added so that you can “watch” the election. Other tweaks have also been made.

Feedback is desired.

2016 – United States presidential election in New Hampshire – Beta version

The State of New Hampshire provided one of the closest races in the 2016 election with Hillary Clinton narrowly defeating Donald Trump. The results in Pennsylvania and Michigan meant that New Hampshire wasn’t as pivotal as it could have been.

Here you have an opportunity to battle 2016 out in New Hampshire;

Beta version – New Features;

Primaries for the GOP, Dems, Libertarian and Green (Delegate numbers are x10 from real life so the numbers provide more competition across the 10 counties, (GOP = 230 rather than only 23 across 10 counties.)

Endorsers – Newspaper interviewers added as endorsers. For those papers who endorsed candidates in more than one party these have been set as ‘Centre’. GOP or DEM only are set respectively as centre-right or centre-left. The Governor, Senators and Representatives have been added also.

The GOP seem overpowered when starting from the Primaries (I think is has something to do with the number of candidates in each primary, 8 GOP vs 2 DEM). For better results enabling more Democrats is a good idea. In order to counter the GOP bias issue, I have made all counties adhere to the default 2016 scenario for NH.

Feel free to suggest improvements and ways to counter the overpowered GOP.

2016 – United States presidential election in New Hampshire (Alpha version)

2016 – United States presidential election in New Hampshire (Beta version)

1968 US Presidential Election (VCCzar version)

1968 US Presidential Election (VCCzar version)

This election is an expanded/updated version of the 1968 election that comes with the game. The Historical Scenario Commission created it on October 15, 2017. It can be downloaded here: United States – 1968 – v. 1.0

The scenario includes the actual candidates for this historic election, as well as what-if candidates.

1988 Version 1

“This scenario was updated by the Historical Scenario Commission on November 12, 2017 and can be downloaded here”

5a087ab3df61b_UnitedStates-1988v2.0

The 1988 campaign featured an open contest on both the Republican and Democratic sides, as Republican Pres. Ronald Reagan was entering the last year of his second term. Numerous contenders on the Democratic side entered the race. Commentators referred derisively to them as “The Seven Dwarfs.” They included former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt, Delaware Sen. Joe Biden, Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, Missouri Rep. Richard Gephardt, Tennessee Sen. Al Gore, civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, and Illinois Sen. Paul Simon. Three candidates who were somewhat more inspiring had decided not to run: former senator Gary Hart of Colorado, who dropped out because of a sex scandal, reentered the race and then dropped out for good; Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy; and New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who simply declined to run. The Republicans, seeking a candidate who could match the stature and electability of Reagan, were similarly at a loss. The nominal front-runner, George Bush, suffered from a reputation as a “wimp” who in 22 years of public life—as a former representative, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and, for more than seven years, Reagan’s vice president—had failed to distinguish himself as anything more than a docile instrument of someone else’s policy. There were three interesting Republican alternatives: Bob Dole of Kansas, the Senate minority leader, who was respected for his wit and intelligence though considered by some to be overly acerbic; former New York representative Jack Kemp, revered among many conservatives as Reagan’s true ideological heir; and the Rev. Pat Robertson, a popular televangelist. None of the three, however, made it through the primary season. With the Reagan era drawing to a close, the wide open race has top names both sides of the political spectrum running for the top job. Liberal and Conservative Reverends, Hawks and Doves in both parties, which way will America turn?

Please feel free to give feedback.

Previous version:

United States – 1988

My Confederate Series – 1873

My Confederate Series – 1873

In 1867, General Robert E. Lee was elected President of the Confederate States. He chose to keep many members of the Davis administration, with Vice President Alexander Stephens being reelected and Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge being appointed Secretary of State. But on October 12, 1870, President Lee died from the effects of pneumonia shortly after suffering a stroke, elevating Stephens to the Presidency. President Stephens has chosen not to run for the Presidency in his own right, leaving Secretary Breckinridge as the front-runner to become the next President as the country’s economy seems to be taking a dive.  Candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • Sec. of State John C. Breckinridge
  • Sec. of the Treasury Robert M.T. Hunter
  • Spkr. Thomas Bocock
  • Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest
  • Sen. Robert W. Johnson
  • Sen. Augustus Maxwell
  • Pres. Alexander Stephens (what-if?)

Whigs

  • Fmr. Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. James W. Flanagan
  • Fmr. Sen. Joshua Hill
  • Rep. George Washington Logan