My Confederate Series – 1879

My Confederate Series – 1879

In 1873, Secretary of State John C. Breckinridge was elected to be the 4th President of the Confederate States of America and Secretary of War Richard Taylor of Louisiana was elected to be the 2nd Vice President. However, the past 6 years have been very turbulent, with not one, but two more Presidents dying in office. The chaos started on May 17, 1875, when President Breckinridge died from complications of surgery, elevating Vice President Taylor to the Presidency. But on April 12, 1879, 7 months before the election of 1879, President Taylor also died, resulting in the President pro tempore of the Senate (next in the line of succession), Sen. John B. Gordon, becoming the 6th President of the Confederate States. Also, Missouri (1875), Tennessee (1878), and Kentucky (1879) have all abolished slavery with other states expected to follow, mostly as a result of a major depression sapping the country’s economy. The opposition parties, the New Republican party, the Confederate American party, and the Liberty party, are expected to garner more support combined than the Democratic party, resulting in what is expected to be the closest election in the country’s young history. Can President Gordon beat out General Beauregard for the Democratic nomination and win the Presidency in his own right, or will the CSA have its first non-Democratic President? Candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard
  • Pres. John B. Gordon (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election)
  • Fmr. Sen. John W. Stevenson
  • Sen. Matt Ransom
  • Associate Justice David M. Key
  • Fmr. Gov. James M. Smith

What-if?s

  • Pres. Richard Taylor (ascended to the Presidency through the line of succession, therefore eligible for election, had he not died)
  • Rep. Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr.

New Republicans

  • Fmr. Sen. James Alcorn
  • Fmr. Rep. Alexander S. Wallace
  • Fmr. Rep. George Harris
  • Att. Gen. William H. Hunt
  • Fmr. Rep. George Washington Logan

Confederate American

  • Fmr. Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. Zebulon Baird Vance

Liberty Party

  • Rep. Joseph Rainey

My Confederate Series – 1873

My Confederate Series – 1873

In 1867, General Robert E. Lee was elected President of the Confederate States. He chose to keep many members of the Davis administration, with Vice President Alexander Stephens being reelected and Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge being appointed Secretary of State. But on October 12, 1870, President Lee died from the effects of pneumonia shortly after suffering a stroke, elevating Stephens to the Presidency. President Stephens has chosen not to run for the Presidency in his own right, leaving Secretary Breckinridge as the front-runner to become the next President as the country’s economy seems to be taking a dive.  Candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • Sec. of State John C. Breckinridge
  • Sec. of the Treasury Robert M.T. Hunter
  • Spkr. Thomas Bocock
  • Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest
  • Sen. Robert W. Johnson
  • Sen. Augustus Maxwell
  • Pres. Alexander Stephens (what-if?)

Whigs

  • Fmr. Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. James W. Flanagan
  • Fmr. Sen. Joshua Hill
  • Rep. George Washington Logan

 

My Confederate Series – 1867

With President Jefferson Davis term-limited, the race to become the 2nd President is wide-open. However, three men have separated themselves from the pack: Vice President Alexander Stephens, Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge, and General Robert E. Lee. Can one of these men carry on Davis’s leadership and prevent the downfall of the Confederacy?  The candidates are as follows:

Democrats

  • VP Alexander Stephens
  • Gen. Robert E. Lee
  • Sec. John C. Breckinridge
  • Sen. Robert M.T. Hunter
  • Fmr. Sec. Robert Toombs
  • Fmr. Sen. C.C. Clay Jr.
  • Sen. Louis Wigfall
  • Gov. Thomas Watts
  • Sen. Herschel Johnson
  • Att. Gen. George Davis
  • Gen. Joseph E. Johnston

Whigs

  • Gov. Joe Brown
  • Sen. William Graham
  • Rep. George Washington Logan

My Confederate Series – 1867